MCWRA Board of Director Elections; Call for Additional Nominations

October 22, 2014

On behalf of the MCWRA Governance Committee, there is a call from its executive membership representatives for additional nominations for the MCWRA Board of Director 2015-2016 term.

The Governance Committee: County of Placer Supervisor Jim Holmes, South Tahoe PUD Board member Jim Jones,  Foresthill PUD general manager Hank White, and Grizzly Flats CSD general manager Jodi Lauther.

A Director’s term is two years.  Terms Expiring:

  1. Bill George, Board Member, El Dorado Irrigation District
  2. Delbert Rotelli, Board Member, Tuolumne Utilities District
  3. Art Toy, Board Member, Amador Water District

*All Three members have elected to re-run for the Board of Directors*

The qualifications for Directors include:  (i) active employment with, or representation of, an Executive Member; and (ii) dedication to the purposes of Mountain Counties stated in Article III of the Association Bylaws.  The Board may also consider any other relevant qualifications.

The Nominating Committee has nominated the following people for the next 2015-2016 term.

  1. Bill George, Board Member,  El Dorado Irrigation District
  2. Delbert Rotelli, Board Member, Tuolumne Utilities District
  3. Art Toy, Board Member,  Amador Water District

Each executive member representative (general manager/CAO) has been solicited for additional nominees.  Any addition nominee selection(s) from the representative are due back to MCWRA (via email) no later than November 18, 2014.

On November 24, 2014, the Executive member general manager or CAO will receive an electronic ballot with a list of the nominees and a request to cast vote for three (3) MCWRA Board members.  The Governance Committee will review the ballots and provide a report at the December 16, 2014 Board of Directors meeting.

Seating of Officers will be at the January 6, 2015, Board of Directors meeting.

 

IRWM Stakeholder Capacity-Building Workshop – Mountain Counties Location Added

October 21, 2014

The Department of Water Resources (DWR) adds mountain counties location to the November 6, 2014, IRWM Stakeholder Capacity-Building Workshop.

LOCATION:  El Dorado Irrigation District, 2890 Mosquito Rd., Placerville

Dear IRWM Interested Parties,

DWR is organizing an IRWM Stakeholder Capacity-Building Workshop, scheduled for Thursday, November 6 from 9am to 4pm.  The primary purpose of the workshop is to provide tactical assistance (e.g., tools and resources) to IRWM stakeholders, with a particular focus on the needs of tribes, disadvantaged communities, and local agencies; however, all IRWM stakeholders are welcome!

The workshop will be held simultaneously in Redding, Stockton, Placerville, Clovis, and Los Angeles (addresses below), with webcast plenary sessions and on-site interactive sessions throughout the day.

Redding Stockton
City of Redding – Corporation Yard San Joaquin County – Cabral Agricultural Center
Training Room Building #4 2101 E. Earhart Ave, Stockton, CA 95206
20055 Viking Way, Redding, CA 96003
Clovis Los Angeles
Public Utilities Department Arroyo Seco Regional Branch Library
Solid Waste Division 6145 N. Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90042
155 N. Sunnyside Ave, Clovis, CA 93611
Placerville
El Dorado Irrigation District
Sly Park Conference Room
2890 Mosquito Road
Placerville, CA 95667

 

(1)    Please mark your calendar for Thursday, November 6.

(2)   Share the attached save the date notice and agenda with other stakeholders in your IRWM region(s). A formal announcement will follow   shortly with detailed workshop information (i.e., RSVP, lunch, and limited travel scholarships).

SAVE THE DATE – IRWM Stakeholder Workshop – Nov 6

AGENDA_IRWM_Stakeholder_Workshop – Nov 6

MCWRA Program Reminder – next week – Innovative Water Technologies for California

October 7, 2014

It is not too late to RSVP for the program intended for California legislators and staff, state agencies, regional and local elected officials and staff, water purveyors and land use decision makers

This is a one-day, fast, friendly and free introduction to the latest and greatest technologies in water management.  Now is the time!

RSVP TODAY:  http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/854767#comments

 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014         8:45 a.m. – 3 p.m.            

LAKE NATOMA INN  702 Gold Lake Drive, Folsom CA 95630 (916) 351-1500   http://www.lakenatomainn.com/

  • Re-imagining ground water management
  • Conjunctive water use options – and water saving opportunities
  • Hydropower generation opportunities
  • Water banking – There is a market for it
  • A fresh look at water user-environmental frictions
  • Controlling sediment in mountain recreation areas
  • Geology of ground water and aquifer management
  • Increasing water yield with regional water storage possibilities
  • Seismic dam safety and risk assessment
  • A watershed approach to fish passage feasibility

PROGRAM AND AGENDA : MCWRA Poster (print)_9.30.14 (2)

          RSVP TODAY:  http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/854767#comments

North State Water Alliance Support California Water Bond – Proposition 1

October 1, 2014

 LOGO 5NCWA JPGRWALogoSACOGLogometrochamber05_logo_noSMCC

The North State Water Alliance Founding Members issued a formal Proposition 1 Support statement.  Click the link : NSWA Prop 1 Support Statement

North State Water Alliance to: Promote responsible statewide water solutions that protect the economy, environment and quality of life for the north state and for all Californians.

NSWA is a growing coalition of cities, counties, water providers, business, agriculture and agencies throughout Northern California.

visit www.northstatewater.org

 

 

 

 

 

MCWRA Member Drought Collaboration – TUD & PG&E

September 30, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Lisa Westbrook

Public Relations

(209) 532-5536, x501

SONORA, CA:

Tuolumne Utilities District and Pacific Gas and Electric Company unite to highlight the collaboration that is needed during the drought in a video produced by PG&E, “Partnering during the Drought.” This two minute video filmed in July, on location at Lyons Reservoir, will be released this week in coordination with PG&E’s Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Report.

The video highlights how PG&E is effectively managing its hydroelectric resources during California’s drought―working to meet their customers’ energy needs through extensive planning, due diligence and engagement. It features PG&E’s work with the Tuolumne Utilities District as an example of how they work closely with water agencies, first responders and regulatory agencies to help address drought impacts. This includes conserving water in reservoirs so clean, affordable hydropower will be available during peak demand periods.

Tuolumne Utilities District News Release

Video

 

California Proposition 1, the Water Bond Summary

September 9, 2014

California Proposition 1, the Water Bond (Assembly Bill 1471), is on the November 4, 2014 ballot in California as a legislatively-referred bond act.  The measure, upon voter approval, would enact the Water Quality, Supply, and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014

Alf W. Brandt, Legislative Director for Assemblymember Anthony Rendon provided the following information and a summary of AB 1471.

“In recent weeks, several people have asked if we could provide a brief summary of AB 1471 (Rendon), the 2014 water bond.  Now that the Legislature has adjourned, I have had time to develop the attached summary, which I share with you as one of the many people who have followed the water bond discussions through my e-mails.”

“The water bond that Governor Brown signed, which can be attributed to the work of many people in the Legislature and the Brown Administration, reflects well on the last 15 months of work that Assemblymember Rendon has led in the Assembly.  Mr. Rendon chaired 9 regional water bond hearings by the Water, Parks & Wildlife Committee, from Indio to Eureka, and several other hearings in the Capitol.  The last year has seen the most transparent water bond development process in history.  AB 1471 reflects the concerns of Californians for their water future.  We were proud to be part of that water bond process.”

“I look forward to working with you in the future, on other critical water issues for California’s future.”

Click for the details: 2014 Water Bond Summary

 

 

 

RSVP Today for the Innovative Water Technologies for California Program

September 7, 2014

Program is for California legislators and staff, state agencies, regional and local elected officials and staff, water purveyors and land use decision makers

You are invited to a one-day, fast, friendly and free introduction to the latest and greatest technologies in water management.  Now is the time!

RSVP TODAY:  http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/854767#comments

 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014         8:45 a.m. – 3 p.m.            

LAKE NATOMA INN  702 Gold Lake Drive, Folsom CA 95630 (916) 351-1500   http://www.lakenatomainn.com/

  • Re-imagining ground water management
  • Conjunctive water use options – and water saving opportunities
  • Hydropower generation opportunities
  • Water banking – There is a market for it
  • New best friends – Regional water management
  • A fresh look at water user-environmental frictions
  • Controlling sediment in mountain recreation areas
  • Geology of ground water and aquifer management
  • Increasing water yield with regional water storage possibilities
  • Seismic dam safety and risk assessment
  • A watershed approach to fish passage feasibility

Program Announcement

Program Agenda

          RSVP TODAY:  http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/854767#comments

MCWRA Program – Innovative Water Technologies for California

September 1, 2014

To:  California legislators and staff, state agencies, regional and local elected officials and staff, water purveyors and land use decision makers

You are invited to a one-day, fast, friendly and free introduction to the latest and greatest technologies in water management.  Now is the time!

RSVP TODAY:  http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/854767#comments

 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014         8:45 a.m. – 3 p.m.            

LAKE NATOMA INN  702 Gold Lake Drive, Folsom CA 95630 (916) 351-1500   http://www.lakenatomainn.com/

  • Re-imagining ground water management
  • Conjunctive water use options – and water saving opportunities
  • Hydropower generation opportunities
  • Water banking – There is a market for it
  • New best friends – Regional water management
  • A fresh look at water user-environmental frictions
  • Controlling sediment in mountain recreation areas
  • Geology of ground water and aquifer management
  • Increasing water yield with regional water storage possibilities
  • Seismic dam safety and risk assessment
  • A watershed approach to fish passage feasibility

Program Announcement

Program Agenda

          RSVP TODAY:  http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/854767#comments

The Importance of Upper Watershed Management to California’s Water Supply

August 27, 2014

At their August meeting, the California Water Commission held a panel discussion on the Upper Watershed Management Effects on Water Supply and the Water-Forest Management Nexus.  Joseph Byrne, Chair, referenced the May 21 MCWRA /Water Commission workshop and said that this is “a subject that the Commission is particularly interested in. We had a great workshop with small and medium sized systems in Auburn and had some very interesting information.”

2014 May 21 Water Commission Workshop (9)

May 21 Workshop in Auburn

At the day-long workshop referenced by Commissioner Byrne, the Commission heard from 14 speakers from across the mountain counties area.  (for the May 21 Workshop story, click here)

I am very grateful to Sue Sims and her staff  for their help in coordinating this important workshop for the Water Commission, MCWRA members, and our regional partners, said John Kingsbury, MCWRA executive director.   It gave us the opportunity to discuss the challenges, programs, collaboration and opportunities from members and partners that are balancing a limited water supply to meet the needs of this region and of the State.

Upper Watershed Management Effects on Water Supply and the Water-Forest Management Nexus

As the Commission heard at the May workshop in Auburn, with much of the state’s water supply originating in the mountains as precipitation on the forested landscape, the health and management of the upper watersheds are critically important to California’s water quality and water supply.

At the August meeting of the California Water Commission, George Gentry with the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection, and Dr. Martha Conklin and Dr. Roger Bales from UC Merced discussed the relationships between forests and water.

For the story, click here for the link to Maven’s Notebook 

Nevada Irriation District Begins Planning for a New Reservoir

August 26, 2014

By Rem Scherzinger, General Manager

The NID Board of Directors on Wednesday (Aug. 13) took a historic step into the water future of Nevada and Placer counties.

The board authorized staff to file an application for the annual appropriation of 221,400 acre-feet of water from the Bear River. The district’s application was filed later that day with the State Water Resources Control Board along with the payment of $488,459 in filing fees.

This is the first of many steps that are foreseen in coming years as part of the planning, financing and construction of a new 110,000 acre-foot reservoir on the Bear River between our existing Rollins and Combie reservoirs.

This is locally known as the Parker Reservoir would extend upriver from just above Combie Reservoir for six miles to a point west of Colfax. Hydroelectric energy production and public recreational opportunities are expected to be part of the project.

The Parker Reservoir site has been part of NID’s water portfolio since the early 1920s when district founders were planning the NID water system. In 1926, the district’s chief engineer, Fred H. Tibbetts, in what is now referred to as the Tibbetts Report, documented the positive attributes of a Parker reservoir. Tibbetts found the Parker site to be superior to Rollins, Dog Bar and Combie, which were also part of a Bear River reconnaissance project.

NID holds senior pre-1914 water rights to the Bear River and has over time acquired additional post-1914 water rights. In its formative years, NID acquired several hundred acres of land along the river. NID owns more than 1,200 acres within the Parker Reservoir project area, which also extends to some adjacent lands.

Parker Reservoir would directly benefit the southern portions of NID, including the district’s Placer County service areas. Upstream areas in Nevada County will also benefit as the district would be able to route more water from the mountains down the Yuba River/Deer Creek watershed and less down the Bear River side.

Today’s drought certainly raises awareness of the importance of water storage but our planning goes much further. It is clear that climate change is bringing uncertainty to our state’s water supplies. The NID water system is over-reliant on the “water bank” that lies in the annual mountain snowpack. We must develop lower elevation storage that can capture runoff from rain storms as well as snow storms.

This water resource development will be a cornerstone achievement in NID’s 93-year history. The district was formed in 1921 and was expanded significantly 50 years ago with the 1963-66 development of the Yuba-Bear Power Project. Parker Reservoir would increase water storage available to district residents from 280,000 to 390,000 acre-feet, helping to ensure a stable water supply for district customers for generations to come.

It is estimated that planning and building Parker Reservoir would cost approximately $160 million. NID would use revenues from hydroelectric energy production (these funds were used to pay the initial filing fees), potential funding through state water bonds and other sources, and probably a local bond issue. A half-century ago, NID voters overwhelmingly approved a local bond issue to fund the Yuba-Bear Project. Those bonds have been repaid and district residents today enjoy a much stronger and reliable water system, along with significant annual revenues from power production.

It is our hope that we will receive the same strong community support as we move forward in this important effort. The preservation and use our valuable “area of origin” water resources here at home is in the very best interests of NID customers and taxpayers.

Nevada Irrigation District website

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